Fiscallini

by Matt on April 24, 2007

Fiscalini

Back in 2003 I fell in love with Modesto’s Fiscalini Bandaged Cheddar. Until that point I pretty much ignored the American-made counterparts and relied on the real deals when I hankered for the beloved British cheese. There were tons of other great California and American-made cheeses that didn’t encroach upon one of the world’s most favorite cheeses. However, my first bite of Fiscalini was indeed an epiphany. This farmstead cheese is aged for 18 months and wrapped in bandages, and because it’s made with the milk obtained from animals located on the farm it’s unique and unlike anything else. It’s tangy, complex, and a perfect mature cheese. Perfect perfect perfect perfect!

I wasn’t surprised when it won the 2004 American Cheese Society Silver Medal Awards; it’s one of the best American cheeses you can taste. However. I am completely giddy to hear it recently won 2 gold medals and 1 silver medal in the cheddar categories in London at the 2007 World Cheese Awards.

Winning the Wyke Farms Trophy for best extra mature cheddar in the world is no easy feat, and the website says it’s the first time in the 20 year history of the WCA that this trophy has been granted to someone outside of Great Britain.

An American cheese winning best extra mature cheddar? People, this is an amazing feat! And it’s an amazing cheese! I suppose this means I’ll have to stop by the market tonight, grab a hunk and celebrate for dinner.

I mean, it’s the least I can do, right? 

Way to go, Fiscalini!

{ 9 comments… read them below or add one }

Mary April 24, 2007 at 12:37 pm

Matt, how could you? Just when I was starting to think about something other than cheese this week. I’m going to order some of this and then get back to watching cheddarvision.tv.

J Wade April 24, 2007 at 4:39 pm

funny you should be thinking about cheese. Just two hours ago I was eating another great, world class american cheese. Ig Vella’s monterey dry jack right here in Sonoma! We are on a bike tour for work (rough I know) and we stopped by his place and got a little tour of his drying rooms. Yummy stuff indeed.

Chicken Fried Gourmet April 24, 2007 at 6:11 pm

So where can I get this cheese ?

Christine (myplateoryours) April 24, 2007 at 6:55 pm

Boy, wish I could just pick it up at the market. It’s mail-order for me. But you are right. Truly a great cheese.

J Wade April 24, 2007 at 8:06 pm

and the good fortune continues……as luck would have it,our company dinner tonite in Sonoma was at the Girl and Fig and what should be on the cheese tasting menu? Fiscalini! The best part was no one at my table was into the cheese course, so I got it all to myself! What an outstanding cheese. Everything it’s cracked up to be I would say. There was a lovely Joe Matos St George (one of favorite cheeses). I feel like I hit the cheese tri fecta today!

Allyson April 24, 2007 at 11:02 pm

Fiscalini is a favorite of mine and it is one of the most popular cheeses at the cheese shop I work at. Pleasant Ridge Reserve is another fantastic award winning American artisan cheese.

Linda April 25, 2007 at 8:28 am

Matt -

I went to a dairy farm a few months back called Bobolink Dairy. They claim to be one of the first cheese producers in the States to export to Europe. They have amazing varietals all named by the wife of the couple that produces them… very interesting flavors. they have fun names like “frolic”-named for the cows. You can check out their site at http://www.cowsoutside.com/ if you’re interested. By the time i got ALL the way out there (inspired by an Anthony Bourdain episode) I was told they have a stand at the Union Square Market, only 8 blocks from my apt at that time. I don’t know if they go as far as CA but if you ever see something from their farm, I suggest you grab a taste.

Linda April 25, 2007 at 8:29 am

p.s. you should do the photography for their site… this one is lovely.

Lizzy April 25, 2007 at 12:05 pm

I just discovered your blog a couple of weeks ago and love the photography and your writing. I am officially addicted to your blog.

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