Grenadine Revisited

by Matt on December 7, 2007

Messy_2

Why yes I’m fully aware that this photo looks like a crime scene and yes, I realize it’s a bit over the top and yes, I won’t be angry with you for not stopping me when I decided to make grenadine again.

Let me set the stage for you: extra poms on the kitchen counter, some vodka, a friend in town, pink hands, you get the picture.

And you’d think I would have learned my lesson already, sheesh.

But I must admit it was well worth the effort. Homemade grenadine is nothing like that bottled stuff, and every year I look forward to making a few batches and staining everything within 12 feet of me and my cutting board. It really makes all the difference in a cocktail and I suppose you could use it for other non-celebratory purposes.

Cheers!

Juiceandcocktails

Basic Grenadine Recipe
Because I like the
tartness of pomegranates I usually go easy on the sugar, or I omit the
sugar completely when making a reduction. This allows me to use my
syrup not only in cocktails but as a dressing or marinade for savory
recipes. It can also be made with honey.

2 cups pomegranate juice (I can’t advise you on a good method because I always make a mess no matter how hard I try)
1 cup sugar (or less if you prefer it not so sweet)

Bring juice to a simmer over medium heat and cook until reduced by
half. Reduce heat and add sugar, stirring constantly until it
dissolves, about 2 or 3 minutes. Allow liquid to cool completely and
then refrigerate. It should last about 1 week.

{ 26 comments… read them below or add one }

Alicia December 7, 2007 at 7:28 am

This is all I could find on juicing pomegranates:

http://mideastfood.about.com/od/tipsandtechniques/ht/pomjuice.htm

Mmm… sounds good though.

Andrew Ritchie December 7, 2007 at 8:29 am

LOVE the photo! Murderous and quaint at once.

-Andrew in Canada

Laura December 7, 2007 at 9:07 am

– I suppose you could use it for other non-celebratory purposes. –

Homemade truffles with pomegranate syrup. Perfect!

James Tracy December 7, 2007 at 9:57 am

Note to Author:

“How to clean Pomegranates”.

1. Fill the kitchen sink full of clean water.

2. Make a vertical cut slightly into the rind of the fruit going all the way around it from stem to bottom back to stem.

3. Place fruit under water in sink and pull into 2 halves.

4. Hold one half underwater and begin removing the seeds. Let the seeds float down to the sink bottom and allow the rind & other particles float to the top.

5. Repeat step 4 with the other half of fruit.

6. Use a strainer or wire mesh utensil to sift of the floating debris in the sink water.

7. Retrive the seeds from the bottom of the sink and place in clean strainer.

8. Reove any seeds left with partial debris on them from strainer and place back under water for cleaning.

9. Once all the seeds have been cleaned, allow water to drain away and place seeds on a double lined paper or kitchen towel.

10. Enjoy!

Please give this a try the next time you need to clean pomegranates. You might find yourself eating and enjoying more of this wonderful fruit when they are in season.

Sincerly

JT

Chad Edward December 7, 2007 at 10:54 am

Regardless of how slick you think you are in the kitchen or behind the bar, pomegranate humbles every man before giving up her delicious fruit.

Kristin December 7, 2007 at 11:03 am

I just made a pomegranate sangria (and blogged about it) and had a similar reaction to my pomegranate prep. The word that kept coming to mind when I looked at the photos (and it’s coming to mind now looking at yours) was carnal. But it was also fun — so I think I’ll have to give grenadine a try.

TexanNewYorker December 7, 2007 at 12:49 pm

Perhaps I’m blaspheming by saying this, but could you use store-bought pomegranate juice?

mary December 7, 2007 at 5:45 pm

Matt, you are my hero. I was just talking about making grenadine and here you’ve already done it. I’m supposing that this could be frozen and stored for quite some time that way.

Julia December 8, 2007 at 2:32 am

Fantastic! I was asking for cocktail recipes over on my food forum, so I’ll post a link to this one. Thanks so much.

P.S. Love the first photo!

Monica December 8, 2007 at 3:21 am

I actually quite like that photo! :) It should be hanging in some modern museum! ;)

Jenny December 8, 2007 at 5:42 am

I have the secret to deseeding the rascally little devils. Cut the pomegranate in half, hold it seed down in the palm of your hand, fingers spread apart, and hit the skin side with a big spoon. It sounds crazy, but it works and it’s easy! Just make sure you have a big bowl because the seeds will come flying out.

Helen December 8, 2007 at 6:29 pm

I love that photo :D

nicole December 8, 2007 at 10:34 pm

hey matt- i enjoy the site. but just a bit of info for you from someone who was born and raised in the LBC. it stands for Long Beach City, not Long Beach CA. Just ask Snoop :)

Venkatesh Iyer December 9, 2007 at 2:23 am

I liked the picture very much. Pomegranates are very good for health also. It has medicinal properties. In India, we usually take the skin out and crush them. After crushing, make it into a fine powder and mix with honey. It is very good for diarrohoea.

DocChuck December 9, 2007 at 1:26 pm

Great post. SUPER photos.

Thanks.

At Home with kim vallee December 9, 2007 at 2:51 pm

They could use your photo on Dexter.

Janna December 9, 2007 at 2:53 pm

I LOVE this photo!

Fantastic lighting. Way to break the rules when it makes a great photo!

Cheese and Choux December 9, 2007 at 7:16 pm

Wow! That’s one of the most startling food pictures that I’ve seen in a long time. Much praise to the very raw, very naked visual imagery.

Last Crumb December 10, 2007 at 11:44 pm

Great post, and a beautiful photo! It’s nice to find another Long Beach food blogger while least expecting it. There aren’t many of us in this corner of the state for some reason.
I just went through the process of making homemade grenadine for the first time about two weeks ago and found that a touch of lemon juice and a few drops of vanilla play nicely with the pomegranate’s flavor. I also added a bit of vodka to the mix hoping to increase the shelf life, and so far it still tastes fresh and wonderful after two weeks in the refrigerator.

Cheers,
Will

John December 11, 2007 at 10:17 am

Hey Matt, great post and photo but is that a typo in your title? “Revisted”

Hillary December 11, 2007 at 4:00 pm

Never knew how grenadine was made! Thanks for the recipe.

MrsDocChuck December 17, 2007 at 2:17 pm

I am sorry. My husband has been quite heavily abusing nasal spray once again and littering food blogs with his incoherance.

Helen Page December 29, 2007 at 8:58 am

I made a persimmon and pom salad from Suppers at Lucques and I tweaked a method she uses for juicing poms: roll it around on a counter to soften it, score it with an x and squeeze over a small bowl, score another spot and squeeze. i did this all over the pom and got enough juice for the salad–3 tbs more or less-without too much mess and still was able to use the seeds. Bit of work but the salad was gorgeous.

half&half December 30, 2007 at 4:52 pm

I did this last night and used nearly the same method described in the first comment. I also loaded about two handfuls of the seeds into cheesecloth and just squeezed a bunch over a bowl. Nothing stained, not even my hands!

half&half December 30, 2007 at 4:52 pm

I did this last night and used nearly the same method described in the first comment. I also loaded about two handfuls of the seeds into cheesecloth and just squeezed a bunch over a bowl. Nothing stained, not even my hands!

half&half December 30, 2007 at 4:52 pm

I did this last night and used nearly the same method described in the first comment. I also loaded about two handfuls of the seeds into cheesecloth and just squeezed a bunch over a bowl. Nothing stained, not even my hands!

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